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General Discussion
Excavation Impacts

Excavation at a project site can bring many types of impacts to the construction project. Excavation impacts can be self-caused or caused by factor totally out of your control. Both can impact your project timeline (the construction schedule) and expense. You must be sure all such impacts be recorded in words and photos. Some, though probably not all, are listed below. The following table provides links to papers on the topic of construction excavation:

Reading Material & References
A Guide to OSHA Excavation Standard.pdf
Excavation in Construction from Construction Knowledge.net.pdf
Excavation Safety _ Environmental, Health and Safety Services _ Virginia Tec.pdf
Excavation_Safety_Guide.pdf
OSHA excavation.PDF
Safe Excavation Work Essentials -- Occupational Health & Safety.pdf
Safe Practices for Small Contractors.pdf
soil_compaction_and_stability_long.pdf
Trenching Hazards.pdf

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Can't Reach Compaction
Requirements

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Moisture Content
Not Optimal

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Artifacts Discovered

If the find is proven to be significant, construction delays could prove to be lenghty.

The first place to check for the appropriate person or institution is your state archaeologist's office. Each state has an official archaeologist and this person or someone on the office staff will be able to help you find your answer. Remember, however, that archaeologists generally need to see an object in its original position in the ground before they can really determine its function. So, when you find an object it is usually better to leave it in place, protect it, and inform local officials. Once an object is removed from its original setting, it often loses much of its informational value.

Evaluating Site Significance

After conducting a survey an archaeologist will have enough information to determine if any significant archaeological resources are located in the study area. If no sites are found, or if the sites are not determined to be “significant” as defined by the law in the National Historic Preservation Act then construction may proceed. The archaeologist will write and file a site report in the State Historic Preservation Office, which describes their research. If significant sites were found, an excavation may be planned. In the next section we will discuss how important data is recovered from archaeological sites through excavation.

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Excavation Collapses

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Deep Freeze

 

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Extreme Heat

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Water-Filled
Trenches & Excavations

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Equipment Problems

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Leaks After Testing
and Burial

 

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Bedrock Outcroppings

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Blocked Access

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Contributor

James G. Zack, Jr.
Executive Director
Navigant Construction Forum,
Navigant Consulting, Inc.
Website

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Impact Documents

Field Work Stopage

Activity/Task Work Stoppage

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Speed Memos/E-mails

Delay Notification

Cost Impact Notification